VMware question

Discussion in 'Ask DACS' started by liquidlevel, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. liquidlevel

    liquidlevel Guest

    It seems that VMWare viewer is the common application to get thin clients connected to the virtual desktops.

    My question is, does a operating system still need to reside on the thin client as a bare essential.

    Also, if an operating system does need to reside on the thin client and you are running a 64bit VMware environment, would it be ideal to have like windows 7 64bit or some 64bit OS on the thin client for optimal speed? I get the desktop is virtualized. I don't understand how the thin client is setup to connect to the virtual desktops
     
  2. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    3
    Most thin clients, I think, run a minimal OS of some type, often a *nix flavor. Another method may be the PXE boot which doesn't utilize an OS on the client, but may not be the most efficient.

    At work our WYSE thin client terminals run a minimal OS on it. I think it is running some *nix flavor (a custom one possibly) to connect to our Windows Server 2008.

    The client will need 64 bit hardware to handle a 64 bit session, but the server should be capable of distributing a 32 bit version which will be more compatible with systems.

    I would guess there would be a benefit to using 64bit systems all-around (client ,server session, etc.)

    Sorry, I don't know much of anything about virtual desktops in relation to thin client sessions. Most of my experience was poking around LTSP years back and a little on using it here at work.
     
  3. liquidlevel

    liquidlevel Guest

    Sorry if this is a stupid question, but what is *NIX ?

    short for some unix based OS?

    Also, can you explain how PXE works. Does the OS have to be installed on the computer HD or does the PXE bring the OS right into ram and the PC runs the OS from the physical RAM?

     
  4. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    3
    *nix means it is some form of Unix, whether pure Unix, BSD, Linux, Solaris, etc. It isn't a specific form, just somehow related to the Unix underpinnings.

    PXE operates from the BIOS I believe. You don't even have to have a hard drive installed. This might be why it is slower, since it has to scan the network until it finds a machine that responds.

    Look in the BIOS, possibly under the Boot order or boot devices. It may also be listed as something related to Network.

    By the nature of thin clients, the local client is nothing more than a window that "remote controls" the OS over the network. Once a connection is made usually the local client doesn't do more than pass keystrokes and mouse clicks to the server.

    Although thin clients can do much more than that, if both the client and the server are configured so.
     
  5. liquidlevel

    liquidlevel Guest

    Thank you!




     
  6. jscheef

    jscheef Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Liquid,

    Drew is correct that a thin client runs some form of OS. The opposite of a thin client is a fat client in the form of a full Windows, Mac, or Linux installation. Because a thin client is typically a "thin" or "lite" installation of an OS, it can run on a physical computer with less RAM and almost no local storage.

    PXE booting is generally in a ROM in the network adapter. Since most computers have at least one network adapter built in, PXE booting is often enabled as a BIOS setting, as Drew said. Naturally PXE booting requires a server somewhere on the network configured to deliver the boot image to the booting computer whether it be fat or thin.

    VMware Player is a version of VMware that allows you to run an instance of another operating system - a "virtual Machine" or VM - on your fat client computer. The "other operating system" can be anything from a a fat client (another copy of Windows like I use for AskDACS demonstrations) to a copy of Linux configured as a server. With sufficient memory, a single computer can run several VMs at the same time. It is possible to build and test an entire network inside a single computer! VMware Player is popular because it is free and many people have created pre-configured VMs to download and run in VMware Player. There is a lot of information on this in Wikipedia.

    Jim
     
  7. liquidlevel

    liquidlevel Guest

    This information is very helpful. So when the OS image is pulled via the PXE process, does the image stick on the hard drive and remove itself when the pc is logged off the network? Or does the image stay until the server containing the image or images say "hey, you should have a different image" and apply if nessecary?

    Also, with the VMware player, do you need to install the OS's you want to use on the computer you use VMware player on?




     

Share This Page