Dreamweaver Replacement?

Discussion in 'Linux' started by jasetaro, Sep 20, 2008.

  1. jasetaro

    jasetaro Administrator
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    Can anyone recommend a good Dreamweaver replacement for linux?
     
  2. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

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    Dreamweaver is one of those applications people really wish would be ported over to Linux (like iTunes, Photoshop Quicken and Flash).

    Nvu / Komposer are one of the few WYSIWYG applications. They are MS Frontpage-ish in feel and use. Some people have issues with its coding and adding code that makes it a little bit trickier to hand-code later.

    Amaya is W3C's Editor/Browser. I have not used it, so I don't know if it is or still is a text-base application.

    Aptana looks pretty cool, though it is a commercial product it looks to handle a lot of languages (Ajax, Ruby, PHP, Python).

    Bluefish is a pretty good text-based web editor.

    Komodo IDE is another commercial IDE.

    Screem is a Gnome-based web development environment, but like any application in Linux, it can be installed on any desktop environment or window manager. It is a text-based IDE along the lines of Bluefish.

    KDE's Quanta Plus is my current favorite though I haven't used it (or any of the others) very much lately. It is offered by the KDE team and is part of a webdeveloper package in some Linux distributions.

    It provides a tagged view, which is semi-WYSIWYG. The part I like the best is the split screen where you can see the page in one screen and the code in the other and any changes you make to one will be visible in the other.

    Plus, if you install the entire Web authoring package it includes Quanta Plus, Kommander, KXSL Debug, KImageMapEditor, KFileReplace, KLinkStatus and Kallery (their links are included on the side of the Quanta Plus link above).

    Zend is probably one of the standards for PHP programming in Linux and is built on the Eclipse framework. It is also a commercial project. I believe Zend is the corporate sponsor / contributor of the Eclipse PHP Development Tools but I am not 100% sure of their relationship.

    For ASP.NET programming there is a project sponsored by Novell (owners of SuSE and corporate sponsor for the community-orientated openSUSE Linux distributions) called Monowhich provides a .NET compatible framework that allows running unmodified .NET applications on Linux, Mac, Solaris and/or Windows. One an Apache server there is a mod_mono module that allows running ASP.NET applications.

    MonoDevelopis the IDE for developing Mono applications. Some of the most notable Mono applications are Banshee music player, F-Spot photo manager and Tomboy notes.
     
  3. jasetaro

    jasetaro Administrator
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    Thanks Drew, I'm testing Amaya & Kompozer... They look promising but they're not quite as intuitive as Dreamweaver.

    BTW after trying Ubuntu 8.04, openSUSE 11 and Fedora 9 I've settled on Fedora... It seems to be best fit for my needs. :)
     
  4. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

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    I'm interested in hearing what you think about them, as I haven't tried too many of them yet.

    Fedora isn't a big suprise. It seems that between these 3 (in my humble opinion, and this is a stereotype):

    Fedora is for developers
    openSUSE is for professionals
    Ubuntu is for consumers
     
  5. jasetaro

    jasetaro Administrator
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    Yes and no... Ubuntu is definitely the most consumer friendly of the three. I'm not sure Fedora is any better than openSUSE or vice-versa though, either one would've met my needs quite nicely. I settled on Fedora simply because I like their UI implementation better. :) :confused

    I may take another look at openSUSE though... HP's Linux imaging and printing tools don't play nice with SELinux on Fedora. :)
     
  6. snh

    snh Well-Known Member
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    If in Linux/UNIX, why would you need Dreamweaver? Just use Emacs.

    If you must use an app to edit HTML, take a look at KompoZer. It's available for nearly any OS/environment. I use the Portable version run off a USB key within PortableApps.


    Sean
     
  7. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

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    If you really MUST have Dreamweaver some of them do run under Wine.

    http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=application&iId=183

    Ver. 2.x, CS3 and CS4 look to run under Gold (meaning they should work).

    For WYSIWYG Web apps there are not too many choices. If you are willing to code it then even Gedit has HTML and more syntax highlighting.
     
  8. snh

    snh Well-Known Member
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    KompoZer Comments (PortableApps Version 0.7.10):

    Having used KompoZer occasionally for a few months, I have some comments.

    • Be careful when publishing your file to the web - KompoZer doesn't mirror the directories (or if it does, I haven't found how to do it yet). For instance, if you have /index.html and /sub/index.html, and you edit and publish /sub/index.html, it will by default overwrite /index.html. Bad miss if you ask me.
    • Like all WYSIWYG HTML editors I've found so far, it produces HTML that won't validate 100% or obey the DOM - stick with code view for all but the most basic pages or for pages for a client. 100% validated markup is a mark of quality and may be part of a SOW/SLA/Whatever.
    • If your site is database enabled, then Preview will probably not work or render properly. This is true if your database provides part of the HTML structure. This is a non-starter for CFML and a reason to use a DHTML-based developer suite.
    • KompoZer doesn't indicate clearly (to me anyway) whether the file being edited is on the local file, a temp copy of the remote file, or the remote file itself. While it appears capable of using the remote site as the primary source, it either does not default to this or gets confused. For myself and my websites, I always think of the local copy as the copy, and the remote site as the primary where projects have a single developer or pages are checked out under version control. I had a situation where I loaded my site into a local directory, assigned the URL and sub dirs, and thought I was editing my local copy but turned out was editing a temp copy created by Kompozer from the remote copy.[/list:u]

      My final recommendation, then, for KompoZer is use it if you must - and only for the most basic pages/sites. If your target server has more than one "site" based on sub-directories, then double-check all the index pages/sites after publishing anything.


      -S
     
  9. snh

    snh Well-Known Member
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    Another KompoZer update.

    It appears after reading an online tutorial that there is a way to start and contain (restrict) KompoZer to a local repository.

    • In KompoZer, in its Site Manager, create a new site, like 'Foo (Local)'
    • When asking for location and FTP address, submit the same 'file://c:/...' local URL for both
      (PortableApps / KompoZer Portable users will have to make sure their unit's drive letter conforms)
    • Do not specify a FTP username or password
    • Viola - a local site[/list:u]

      Why is this great?

      Can use one of the later version of FileZilla FTP Client to upload to a website, since FileZilla supports mirrored browsing aka Synchronized Directory Browsing.
     
  10. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

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    Great to hear. Is this a feature figured out, or has there been any development on Kompozer?

    Currently I've been using Netbeans with the PHP and Database plugins for my development work but would love something better.
     
  11. snh

    snh Well-Known Member
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    The best IDE I've seen so far (in person) was a demo of CFBuilder for ColdFusion 9, but it is not a visual design tool.

    J: I have Dreamweaver MX 2004 installed on my virtual XP Pro machine. I'd say if looking for DW on a budget, try getting a copy of ColdFusion Studio MX 2004 or Dreamweaver MX 2004 and go with that for a while. The generated HTML won't validate completely but I'm sure you could use TIDY or something to clean up the code.
     
  12. snh

    snh Well-Known Member
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    I'm withdrawing my KompoZer 0.7.x recommendation. It's pointless to edit HTML visually. The Preview mode in all the visual HTML designers just cannot render the included files properly. In source mode, all of the visual editors lack Emacs-style rectangle editing, and also any other text-manipulation. In one, I was trying to center an object tag and could not do it and had to go to code view.

    I currently use Crimson Editor at work. HomeSite+ 5.x is a good choice, and Notepad++ also. Notepad++ does not edit rectangles, however.

    Really, the only thing I've seen that Crimson Editor does not do is remove blank lines, but I just pop that into Notepad++ for a moment to do that.

    In the coming weeks I'll be migrating to a real IDE like CFEclipse or CFBuilder. KompoZer and Dreamweaver and the rest can take a hike.

    The reality is I can type and use the keyboard faster than I can mouse or menu-dive. So, I'm not sure what is gained by a visual editor. This is particularly true when they do not generate valid HTML and thus create more work than they save.
     
  13. dragonbite

    dragonbite Well-Known Member

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    Do you have links to these different ones you are looking at?

    Amaya provides some WYSIWYG with CSS and little else (no Javascript, PHP, etc.). It's not quite as good as Visual Studio where I can split the screen between the web page in design mode (WYSIWYG) and a linked CSS Stylesheet. When I make a change to the stylesheet I can see the results immediately in the web page before I have to save the stylesheet. This way I can try-view-try again until it looks the way I want it before saving.

    For actual coding, though, Netbeans has been the better one for me so far. I haven't used Eclipse for a long time, the last time I did I was low on ram (512MB) so it was rather sluggish.

    The good thing is there seems to be a growing crop of open source projects so who knows what may come down the pipe.
     

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